Forum Posts

Rachel Scott
Dec 10, 2021
In Knowledge & Wisdom Forum
There is a life changing concept that I want to share with you. A process that has come naturally to us since the moment we were born. And something that we take for granted. Breathing. Every 3.3 seconds we breathe, inhale, exhale, unconsciously, relatively effortlessly, and very likely - INCORRECTLY. The message that I want to share with you is that the way we are breathing can either kill us or heal us. But we need to learn how to do it properly, and WHY. For modern humans, the failure to breathe correctly is either causing or aggravating a laundry list of chronic diseases. Asthma, anxiety, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, psoriasis, and more. These maladies can either be reduced or reversed simply by changing the way we inhale and exhale. IN THROUGH THE NOSE AND NOT THE MOUTH. Balanced breathing can preserve both our physical and mental health, enable us to reach higher planes of consciousness, influence our weight and overall health and improve the size and function of our lungs. By learning the “lost art” of correct breathing we can hack our nervous system, control our immune response, and restore our health. And in turn, live longer. A practice that will serve us greatly in the current situations we face in this 21st century. No matter what we eat, how much we exercise, how resilient our genes are, how skinny or young or wise we are - none of it matters unless we are breathing correctly. The missing pillar in health is BREATH. Billions and billions of molecules you bring in with each breath have built your bones, sheaths of muscle, blood, brains, and organs, and these microscopic bits will influence your health and happiness tomorrow, next week, next month, next year, and decades from now. But why do I need to learn how to breathe? I've been doing it my whole life. We assume, at our peril, that breathing is a passive action, just something that we do; breathe, live; stop breathing, die. But breathing is not binary and suffering from respiratory problems (amongst a plethora of other ailments) is not necessary. By learning about the many different forms of breath work you can reduce your blood pressure, boost athletic performance, balance your nervous system, straighten scoliotic spines, blunt autoimmune diseases, raise your temperature, protect your teeth, address snoring and sleep apnea, improve heart rate variability, improve mental clarity, balance blood sugar levels, positively affect weight and metabolism, and more! The air that enters your lungs affects every moment of your life. By developing your knowledge of the power in the breath, you can and will change your life for good. In transporting the breath, the inhalation must be full. When it is full, it has big capacity. When it has big capacity, it can be extended. When it is extended, it can penetrate downward. When it penetrates downward, it will be calmly settled. When it is calmly settled, it will be strong and firm. When it is strong and firm, it will germinate. When it germinates, it will grow. When it grows, it will retreat upward. When it retreats upwards, it will reach the top of the head. The secret power of Providence moves above. The secret power of the earth moves below. He who follows this will live. He who acts against this will die. - 500 BCE ZHOU DYNASTY STONE INSCRIPTION To further your education and knowledge in the area of BREATH I highly recommend the following read. Breathe well, live long, and peace profound, Rachel x
Shut Your Mouth.... and BREATHE content media
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Rachel Scott
Nov 02, 2021
In Knowledge & Wisdom Forum
The only thing we have control over in life is how we choose to respond and react to situations. Life is lived inside out, not outside in.Our emotional and mental wellbeing isn't in the hands of our external circumstance: we choose how to react.Some people need to create noise in their lives because peace scares them.When we have quietness and peace in our lives, it suddenly forces us into a state of self-awareness and reflection.
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Rachel Scott
Oct 27, 2021
In Knowledge & Wisdom Forum
Most of the thoughts that automatically pop into our minds are distorted in some way; they may be unrealistically negative or selective to a fault, ultimately leaving out important information. These cognitive distortions typically result in a negative change in mood and lowered self-esteem. These thoughts occur so frequently that it is easy not to notice them at all, but what we do notice is a sudden feeling of sadness, anxiety or anger. The challenge is learning how to identify these common cognitive distortions, how to challenge them and ultimately replace them with more helpful, realistic thoughts. Can you remember a recent event which caused an automatic thought to pop into your head (for example, 'not good enough' or 'stupid'?)
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Rachel Scott
Oct 22, 2021
In Knowledge & Wisdom Forum
Over the past decade, scientists have made enormous progress on flow. Advancements in brain imaging technologies have allowed us to apply serious metrics where once was only subjective experience. We have learned plenty, including the fact that Csikszentmihalyi was dead-on in his word choice: “flow” is the exact right term for the experience. The state emerges from a radical alteration in normal brain function. In flow, as attention heightens, the slower and energy-expensive extrinsic system (conscious processing) is swapped out for the far faster and more efficient processing of the subconscious, intrinsic system. “It’s an efficiency exchange,” says American University in Beirut neuroscientist Arne Dietrich, who helped discover this phenomena. “We’re trading energy usually used for higher cognitive functions for heightened attention and awareness.” The technical term for this exchange is “transient hypofrontality,” with “hypo” (meaning slow) being the opposite of “hyper” (i.e., fast) and “frontal” referring to the prefrontal cortex, the part of our brain that houses our higher cognitive functions. This is one of the main reasons flow feels flowy—because any brain structure that would hamper rapid-fire decision-making is literally shut off. Read more...
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Rachel Scott
Oct 21, 2021
In Knowledge & Wisdom Forum
https://www.alustforlife.com/tools/how-the-buddhist-metaphor-of-the-second-arrow-can-help-you-be-nicer-to-yourself Read more...
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Rachel Scott
Oct 21, 2021
In Knowledge & Wisdom Forum
Numerous studies have demonstrated that exercise improves not only physical health but also mental health. It reduces the chances that someone would experience depression between 17 and 41 percent, a substantial effect that was observed regardless of age and gender, and that holds true across various types of movement, from walking to lifting weight. Movement doesn’t just help prevent mental illness; it can also treat it. Between 40 and 50 percent of people with depression respond positively to exercise, with an effect that, on a scale of small, medium, or large, is considered large. A similar response rate had been shown for anxiety. These rates are on par with psychotherapy and medication. Sadly in todays modern society, heroic Individualism’s infatuation with gut-wrenching workouts, external appearance, and “exercise” as punishment has clouded how we think about our bodies and how we ought to use them. But, as you’ll soon see, genuine movement is integral to the practice of groundedness. Read More
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Rachel Scott
Oct 21, 2021
In Knowledge & Wisdom Forum
From the beginning of recorded history and regardless of age, race, gender, geography, or line of work, feeling like you are never enough seems to be a significant part of life. We long to feel like we are solid and whole, even though life is always changing. But the feeling has intensified. Heroic individualism is in the water, perpetuated by a modern culture that relentlessly says you need to be better, feel better think more positively, have more and “optimise” your life - only to offer shallow and superficial solutions that, at best, leave you wanting. If some of this sounds familiar, you are not alone. The details may be different. Maybe you dislike your job or have faced acute hardship. Maybe your fresh out of high school or twenty years into your career. Perhaps your approaching retirement, or even already there. But heroic individualism and its most prevalent symptoms describe what so many people report feeling these days. Read more....
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Rachel Scott
Oct 13, 2021
In Knowledge & Wisdom Forum
Conversations on Neuroscience, FLOW and the Upper Reaches of Human Potential
FLOW RESEARCH COLLECTIVE RADIO content media
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Rachel Scott
Oct 13, 2021
In Knowledge & Wisdom Forum
A neuroscience-based peak performance training for entrepreneurs and leaders struggling with distraction, self sabotage and uncertainty.
ZERO to DANGEROUS: Peak Performance Coaching content media
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Rachel Scott
Oct 13, 2021
In Knowledge & Wisdom Forum
Steven Kotler is a New York Times-bestselling author, an award-winning journalist and the Executive Director of the Flow Research Collective. He is one of the world’s leading experts on human performance. ​ He is the author of nine bestsellers (out of thirteen books), including The Art of Impossible, The Future is Faster Than You Think, Stealing Fire, The Rise of Superman, Bold and Abundance. His work has been nominated for two Pulitzer Prizes, translated into over 40 languages, and has appeared in over 100 publications, including the New York Times Magazine, Wired, Atlantic Monthly, Wall Street Journal, TIME, and Harvard Business Review. ​ Steven is also the cohost of Flow Research Collective Radio, a top ten iTunes science podcast. Along with his wife, author Joy Nicholson, he is the cofounder of the Rancho de Chihuahua dog sanctuary.
The Art of IMPOSSIBLE content media
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Rachel Scott
Oct 13, 2021
In Knowledge & Wisdom Forum
Achievement often comes at a cost. Angst, restlessness, frayed relationships, exhaustion, and even substance abuse can be the unwanted side effects of an obsession with outward performance. While the high of occasional wins can keep you going for a while, playing into the always-on, never enough hustle culture ultimately takes a serious toll. In The Practice of Groundedness, bestselling author Brad Stulberg shares a healthier, more sustainable model for success. At the heart of this model is groundedness--a practice that values presence over rote productivity, accepts that progress is nonlinear, and prioritizes long-term values and fulfillment over short-term gain. To be grounded is to possess a firm and unwavering foundation, a resolute sense of self from which deep and enduring, not shallow and superficial, success can be found. Groundedness does not eliminate ambition and striving; rather, it situates these qualities and channels them in more meaningful ways. Interweaving case studies, modern science, and time-honored lessons from ancient wisdom traditions such as Buddhism, Stoicism, and Taoism, Stulberg teaches readers how to cultivate the habits and practices of a more grounded life. Readers will learn: • Why patience is the key to getting where you want to go faster--in work and life--and how to develop it, pushing back against the culture’s misguided obsession with speed and “hacks.” • How to utilize the lens of the wise observer in order to overcome delusion and resistance to clearly see and accept where you are—which is the key to more effectively getting where you want to go • Why embracing vulnerability is the key to genuine strength and confidence • The critical importance of “deep community,” or cultivating a sense of belonging and connection to people, places, and causes. Provocative and practical, The Practice of Groundedness is the necessary corrective to the frenetic pace and endemic burnout resulting from contemporary definitions of success. It offers a new—and better—way. “This book gets to the heart of the matter.” --Ryan Holiday, New York Times bestselling author of Stillness Is the Key and Ego Is the Enemy “This book taps into something that so many of us feel but can’t articulate.” --Arianna Huffington, Founder & CEO, Thrive Global “Ambitious, far-reaching, and impactful." --David Epstein, New York Times bestselling author of Range and The Sports Gene.
The Practice of GROUNDEDNESS content media
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Rachel Scott
Oct 12, 2021
In Knowledge & Wisdom Forum
A bold reimagining of Maslow’s famous hierarchy of needs–and new insights for realising your full potential and living your most creative, fulfilled, and connected life. When psychologist Scott Barry Kaufman first discovered Maslow’s unfinished theory of transcendence, sprinkled throughout a cache of unpublished journals, lectures, and essays, he felt a deep resonance with his own work and life. In this groundbreaking book, Kaufman picks up where Maslow left off, unraveling the mysteries of his unfinished theory, and integrating these ideas with the latest research on attachment, connection, creativity, love, purpose and other building blocks of a life well lived. Kaufman’s new hierarchy of needs provides a roadmap for finding purpose and fulfilment – not by striving for money, success, or “happiness,” but by becoming the best version of ourselves, or what Maslow called self-actualization. While self-actualization is often thought of as a purely individual pursuit, Maslow believed that the full realisation of potential requires a merging between self and the world. We don’t have to choose either self-development or self-sacrifice, but at the highest level of human potential we show a deep integration of both. Transcend reveals this level of human potential that connects us not only to our highest creative potential, but also to one another. With never-before-published insights and new research findings, along with exercises and opportunities to gain insight into your own unique personality, this empowering book is a manual for self-analysis and nurturing a deeper connection not only with our highest potential but also with the rest of humanity. Praise “What a masterpiece! Maslow 2.0—a must-read for anyone who wants to understand what Maslow meant by self-transcendence. Part biography, part treatise, part how-to guide . . . I loved it!” —Angela Duckworth, professor of psychology, University of Pennsylvania; CEO and founder of Character Lab; and New York Times–bestselling author of Grit “This is the book we’ve all been waiting for—nothing less than a breathtaking new psy­chology of humanity. Kaufman will show you how to live your life to the fullest, and in the service of others—all at the same time.” —Susan Cain, New York Times–bestselling author of Quiet “The concept of self-actualization and the transcendent values, which include justice, beauty, meaningfulness, and wholeness, provide a blueprint for a better world. This very well-written volume not only captures Maslow’s work but infuses it with the spirit of inspiration. This book is a major advance in psychology.” —Aaron T. Beck, M.D., professor emeritus of psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania “As a pioneer of humanistic psychology, Maslow is frequently referenced but rarely un­derstood. Scott Barry Kaufman is here to change that. He does a first-rate job restoring the classic pyramid based on Maslow’s own revisions and updating self-actualization in light of contemporary science.” —Adam Grant, New York Times–bestselling author of Originals and Give and Take, and host of the WorkLife podcast “In this book Kaufman studies the legacy of Abraham Maslow’s life’s work in humanistic psychology and expands on this with his own insights and studies. The book gives us a path to self-actualization, to becoming the best person we can possibly become. In the process we discover we do this connected to others and all reality.” —Sharon Salzberg, author of Lovingkindness and Real Happiness “Transcend is rich, deep, and brilliant, a pleasure to read. Scott Barry Kaufman is the new generation’s leading voice in humanistic psychology, a modern-day Abraham Maslow. Updating Maslow’s hierarchy of needs with modern psychology research, Transcend will help readers embark upon a journey to the upper reaches of their potential.” —Emily Esfahani Smith, author of The Power of Meaning “This splendid book is a twofer. It’s a retelling of the life of Abraham Maslow woven through an insightful updating of Maslow’s theory.” —Martin Seligman, director, Positive Psychology Center, University of Pennsylvania, and author of The Hope Circuit “Transcend is a wonderful revival and update of a beloved classic psychological model, as well as a loving ode to its originator. A brilliant assemblage of our current understand­ing of psychological well-being.” —Mark Manson, New York Times–bestselling author of The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck “Mastery in whatever field is an important goal to aspire to, but in these times, when people are experiencing depression and emptiness at an epidemic level, transcendence is an even more critical goal. Scott Barry Kaufman manages to integrate more than seventy-five years of research on the subject to show that the only way to fully self-actualize is, paradoxically, by getting outside of one’s self. This is one of the best books on human potential I’ve ever read.” —Robert Greene, author of The Laws of Human Nature “In this ambitious work, Scott Barry Kaufman not only excavates the unfinished ele­ments of Maslow’s famous hierarchy of needs, but updates and extends it with the latest science. Transcend is a compass for a life well lived.” —David Epstein, New York Times–bestselling author of Range “Scott Barry Kaufman is one of my favourite thinkers about the psychology of getting better and growing as a person.” —Ryan Holiday, New York Times–bestselling author of Stillness Is the Key “Both personal and universal, deep and engaging, easy to follow and mind-shifting, Transcend gives us a new understanding of Maslow’s famous self-actualization model and shows us how we can all achieve the kind of life we aspire to.” —Lori Gottlieb, New York Times–bestselling author of Maybe You Should Talk to Someone “In an age focused on materialism and self-obsession, Kaufman boldly addresses the sci­ence of our deepest, most unanswered needs: connection, meaning, love, transcendence, and self-realization. A revolutionary book destined to become a classic.” —Emma Seppälä, Ph.D., author of The Happiness Track, and science director, Center for Compassion and Altruism Research and Education, Stanford University “Many of the substantive issues humanistic psychology fought for in the middle part of the last century are now at the very core of modern psychology, regardless of your ap­proach or orientation. It is especially timely to revisit the work of one of the greatest humanists of all time, Abraham Maslow, and to update his insights based on the half a century of data that have accumulated since his death. Scott Barry Kaufman has done just that in this wide-ranging and delightful book.” —Steven C. Hayes, codeveloper of acceptance and commitment therapy and author of A Liberated Mind “In this wise, creative, surprising, and exceedingly humane book, Scott Barry Kaufman provides a hierarchy of needs for the modern world, blending the insights of humanistic psychology with the finding of cutting-edge science.” —Paul Bloom, Brooks and Suzanne Ragen Professor of Psychology, Yale University, and author of Against Empathy “Scott Barry Kaufman revivifies the wisdom of humanistic psychology for a new millen­nium. He does it with evidence and discernment, without turning the world into a nail.” —Steven Pinker, professor of psychology, Harvard University, and New York Times–bestselling author of Enlightenment Now “Synthesizing Maslow’s wisdom with modern research, Scott Barry Kaufman takes our understanding of the good life to higher planes. Maslow would have been proud!” —Tal Ben-Shahar, cofounder of the Happiness Studies Academy “There are many books about happiness. There are fewer about living a good life—not a fixed state of being, but an ongoing process that encourages creativity, challenge, and meaning. Transcend is such a book: original, grounded in modern research, and thor­oughly practical.” —Sean Carroll, author of Something Deeply Hidden: Quantum Worlds and the Emergence of Spacetime “Drawing on a vast range of source material, Kaufman has singlehandedly helped to reposition Maslow and humanistic psychology from the periphery to the center of mainstream psychological inquiry. A scientifically grounded, splendidly accessible road map for the spiritual and philosophical uplift of our field.” —Kirk Schneider, Ph.D., author of The Spirituality of Awe “Reading Transcend would bring a broad smile to Maslow’s face and maybe even a shout of ‘Someone finally gets it.’ Often he spoke in our seminars at Brandeis of his frustration that so few understood his work. Scott Barry Kaufman not only shows a rare and pro­found understanding of Maslow’s ideas but, for the first time in fifty years, expands our knowledge of Maslow’s core concepts. This book is worthy of being in every thinking person’s library and being read more than once.” —L. Ari Kopolow, M.D., clinical assistant professor of psychiatry, George Washington University; president emeritus, Suburban Maryland Psychiatric Society; and former student of Abraham Maslow “This is one of the most comprehensive books on what psychology has to say about the path to personal fulfillment. I walked away with a new, sophisticated lens for viewing the motivations behind my actions. I suspect readers will be equally enlightened.” —Todd B. Kashdan, Ph.D., professor of psychology, George Mason University, and author of The Upside of Your Dark Side“ “With wisdom from many fields, and paths and principles to live, this book will enable you to rise to the greatest challenge of our times: to arrive at a new sense of ourselves that is kinder, more inclusive, and oriented to creating a better world. This is a pro­foundly important and timely book.” —Dacher Keltner, professor of psychology, University of California, Berkeley
TRANSCEND: The New Science of Self-Actualization content media
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Rachel Scott
Oct 12, 2021
In Knowledge & Wisdom Forum
Reference: The Journal of Transpersonal Psychology, 2015, Vol. 47, No. 1 Abraham Harold Maslow (/ˈmæzloʊ/; April 1, 1908 – June 8, 1970) was an American psychologist who was best known for creating Maslow's hierarchy of needs, a theory of psychological health predicated on fulfilling innate human needs in priority, culminating in self-actualization.[2] Maslow was a psychology professor at Brandeis University, Brooklyn College, New School for Social Research, and Columbia University. He stressed the importance of focusing on the positive qualities in people, as opposed to treating them as a "bag of symptoms".[3] A Review of General Psychology survey, published in 2002, ranked Maslow as the tenth most cited psychologist of the 20th century.[
THE PLATEAU EXPERIENCE: AN EXPLORATION OF ITS ORIGINS, CHARACTERISTICS, AND POTENTIAL content media
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Rachel Scott

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